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    About Plymouth


    Plymouth automobiles have been a fixture on American roads since the late 1920s. Plymouth was started by Walter Chrysler as an economical answer to the higher-end Chrysler models being manufactured. However, early Plymouth models offered standard features other competitors in its class did not, including hydraulic brakes. In 1928, the Chrysler-Plymouth Model Q premiered, but within a year, the Chrysler part of the name was dropped for the arrival of the Plymouth Model U. The Great Depression would soon take its hold, breaking down the auto industry. The Chrysler Corporation, along with its other divisions Dodge and DeSoto, was boosted by the lower-priced Plymouths, which helped the auto conglomerate stay afloat.

    Throughout the '40s and '50s, Plymouth was one of the best selling car brands in the US, holding its own against Chevy and Ford. By the 1970s, Plymouth enjoyed a stable of stylish, efficient vehicles and genuine Plymouth parts that appealed to a wide range of drivers, including the Volare, Valiant, and Fury (which debuted in 1956). The '80s added on the Reliant, a compact sedan (also available as a wagon) as well as the Voyager, a close relative to the Dodge Caravan minivan that was such a success for Chrysler. The Neon was introduced in 1994 for the 1995 model year as a front-wheel drive compact and would go on to become the most visible model on the roster.

    The Prowler was unveiled for the 1997 model year and received a lot of attention right from the start. Featuring an aggressive, retro-styled front-end along with a 3.5L V6 engine, the Prowler was Plymouth's lone roadster. Although the Prowler generated a sizeable amount of initial buzz (not to mention the respectable presence of the Neon, which was a steady seller), Daimler Chrysler decided it was going to phase out the Plymouth name by 2001. In 2000, Chrysler discontinued the Breeze and the Voyager before halting production on the remainder of the marque's models a year later, with the Neon being the last Plymouth vehicle assembled.

    From the Model Q Coupe in 1928 to its descendent the Neon, Plymouth never disappointed their drivers. Perhaps that's why you notice they are still around in one form or another, making their presence known as the right touch of performance and detail-oriented textures became the Plymouth way. If you have been seeking the right Plymouth parts for your model, CARiD will help you take care of all your needs with all of the interest and care you deserve. Face it. You need the right Plymouth Accessories and Parts for your vehicle. That means quality, value, and choices you can depend on.

    At CARiD, we concentrate on making certain, we provide only the finest Plymouth accessories and parts around at the prices you need to make it happen. We know how important taking care of your vehicle is to you. Let us be part of the process.

    Whether you plan to improve your vehicle's performance or simply want to add some flare to its style, we store an exhaustive collection of accessories and parts designed specifically for your vehicle. Whatever product you choose, you are guaranteed to get nothing but the premium quality, unrivaled performance, and unique style. Understanding that your vehicle deserves only the top accessories and parts, we carefully handpicked each single item. And be sure all of them are manufactured by the most reputable companies in the industry, so the quality is beyond any doubts. If you still are not sure what product to choose, you are welcome to check 24 reviews with an average rating of 4.5 out of 5 stars, and define what accessory or part perfectly fits both your vehicle and your pocket.



    Plymouth Models

    Plymouth News
    NSF Racing 1962 Plymouth Fury Accomplishes Mission Impossible
    NSF Racing 1962 Plymouth Fury Accomplishes Mission Impossible

    There’s life in the old dog yet. This is how the NSF Racing ‘62 Plymouth Fury’s performance at the recent 24 Hours of LeMons event could be described. In the competition where only cars that cost no more than $500 can participate, the Fury won the Index of Effluency prize, which recognizes the team that accomplishes the greatest results with the most improbable car.

    The trophy didn’t come easily to the NSF team and their Plymouth Fury: the car had numerous mechanical problems and never did more than a few dozen laps at one time. With failing carburetor, broken driver’s seat and with oil being forced out of every possible gasket, the Fury looked a disaster. Therefore, the more monumental its achievement of 218 laps around the Carolina Motorsports Park road course was. Those distance was enough for the brave Plymouth to beat out the Sputnik ’86 Nissan Stanza wagon (441 laps) or the Speedycop and the Gang of Outlaws Parnelli Jones Galaxie (243 laps) for the Index of Effluency. Bravo, NSF Racing!