Performance Coil Springs

Variable rate, High Performance

Coil springs support the weight of the vehicle and permit suspension movement. They have two major characteristics: overall free length and rate. Free length is how long the spring is when not installed. Rate is a measure of how stiff it is. If a spring compresses exactly 1” when you add 100 lbs., it’s said to have a 100 lbs. per inch spring rate. Springs are sometimes specified by their diameter as well, but that doesn’t influence how the spring operates.

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We aim to provide our customers with the finest Performance Coil Springs the industry can offer, which is why we accept no compromise when it comes to the quality. Created by the most reputable names in the industry, such as Eibach, KW Suspensions, Hotchkis, ST Suspensions, ReadyLIFT, KSport, Arnott, Skyjacker, Omix-Ada, Rubicon Express, Option-R, Rugged Ridge, Truxxx, Rancho the Performance Coil Springs we've gathered for you feature precise design and everlasting durability.

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The rate of a spring is one of the most fundamental things that affects the handling of a vehicle. The rate needs to be soft enough to let the suspension move over irregularities in the road, and stiff enough to keep from bottoming out or topping out. The balance between the front and rear is critical, and a small difference, even as small as 10%, can make a huge difference in handling.

Stiffening up the rear springs, say in order to keep a larger tire from hitting the fender, will make the car more tail-happy, what racers call loose. Same for the front. Suppose you lower the front for appearance, and substitute stiffer springs to keep from bottoming out. Then the car will push, or understeer. You can also change the free length of a spring and maintain the same rate. It’s a simple matter of winding the coils further apart but using the same overall length of wire. Making the spring longer by adding coils will make it softer. Making it shorter by winding it with less wire, or heating it up with a torch to collapse a coil, or clipping a coil off of a spring will make the spring rate higher.

Some coil springs have what’s called a progressive rate. The coils are wound closer together at one end than the other. As the spring is compressed, the more tightly-wound coils touch, effectively becoming a spacer. This reduces the active number of coils in the spring, making its rate higher. This is sometimes used effectively in vehicles that carry heavy loads to make the ride smooth when unladen, and stiffer when heavy cargo is aboard. The effect is to reduce the amount of suspension deflection. Always mount the closer-spaced coils at the top of the spring. This effectively reduces the unsprung weight, because as the coils touch together and can no longer move, they are essentially simply a spacer. Putting this area next to the chassis rather than next to the wheel effectively makes the movable parts of the suspension lighter, which is good.

Here at CARiD we have springs, and we have springs as part of kits. Unless you are highly knowledgeable about suspension tuning, you’re probably far better off to choose a kit. It will have springs and often sway bars, shocks and bushings that are all tuned to work properly with each other. That’s particularly true if you’re trying to lift or lower a car or truck. The kit will include the right rate and length of springs, sway bars with the correct roll resistance, as well bushings and bump stops that are engineered to work properly as a unit. You’ll maintain the proper balance between understeer and oversteer, ride height and ground and fender clearance. Not to mention the installation instructions.

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Coil Springs Reviews
Average rating:4.54.5 - 44 votes
5(5)
APPEARANCE10
EASE OF INSTALLATION10
PRICE/VALUE10
QUALITY10
Eibach
2011 Dodge Challenger
| Posted by | (Ottawa, IL)

I installed the pro Eibach lowering kit with the anti roll kit and the my 2011 Challenger handles better then I thought it would .

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