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The Suzuki Esteem, also known as the Suzuki Baleno, is a compact car that has been in production between 1995 and 2002. Our site is the place to find all the necessary repair parts for your Suzuki Esteem in a few minutes. Here you will get high-quality Suzuki Esteem repair parts such as air intake parts, exhaust parts, brake parts, etc. at the most attractive prices. So whether you are looking for a new pair of windscreen wipers or some brake pads, you will easily find it on our virtual shelves. If you have any question about this or that product, feel free to contact our team and get any relevant information.

With our ever expanding range of products and simple to search and operate site interface, you will easily find the product you need in a few minutes or so. Buying with CARiD, you don't need to battle the traffic, stand in lines, or bother where to park you vehicle. You can buy whatever product you need from the comfort of your home and have it delivered straight to your door.

The widest range of products, outstanding quality, and affordable prices are the three pillars on which CARiD bases its work. As a result, we provide an extensive selection of high quality Suzuki Esteem repair parts manufactured to restore your vehicle to like new condition at the most attractive prices. No matter whether you are changing an air filter or doing a routine brake job on your Suzuki Esteem, we have everything for your repair and maintenance needs.

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Guides & Articles

  • Recent data from USA Today states that only 6.5% of new vehicles sold in the U.S. are equipped with manual transmissions. The reverse of that means 93.5% of all new cars and light trucks are sold with automatic transmissions. Therefore, the odds are that your ride has an automatic. A less-known fact about those transmissions is that they all have built-in oil coolers, and the vehicle's radiator does double duty, shedding heat from both the engine coolant and the transmission fluid (ATF, or "automatic transmission fluid").
  • It's a great irony of vehicle ownership that while we're proud of our car's style, and want to show it off by washing and waxing it until it's gleaming, we can hardly see the outside of it while driving down the road. Instead, from behind the wheel, we've got hands and feet on all the various controls. In addition to the obvious ones (steering wheel and pedals), there are the buttons and knobs for the windows, mirrors, sound system, climate control, and so on. Over time, these items are subject to as much wear-and-tear as any other part. Sooner or later they will begin to look tattered, or stop functioning all together.
  • Since their inception at the start of the 20th century, motor vehicles with gasoline burning engines have needed a precise way to deliver an electrical spark to each of the engine's cylinders. (Note that diesel engines do not rely on an electrical spark to ignite the fuel-air mixture.) For much of the past 100 years, the spark has been delivered by the ignition distributor. The distributor is always mechanically linked or timed to the engine's rotation so that the spark is sent at the exact moment it is needed.
  • A window regulator is the mechanical assembly behind a door panel that is responsible for moving a glass window up or down along a guided track. Basic window regulators which have been around since enclosed automobiles were first introduced 100 years ago are operated by a hand crank, and power window regulators use an electric motor to do the work of moving the glass along its path. In this article, we'll discuss the basic designs of window regulators and how they work.
  • A Fuel tank sending unit is a term for the mechanical assembly inside your fuel tank which measures the level of liquid in the tank, then reports its findings to the fuel gauge on your instrument cluster. All sending units contain a "float" piece which does just what it describes - floats atop the surface of the fuel. Many automakers design the float piece as an attachment on a hinged arm that pivots as the level in the tank rises or drops. Others design the float piece as a cylinder that rides up and down around a metal shaft.
  • "Antifreeze" is a chemical, primarily consisting of ethylene glycol, which when mixed with water serves to lower the freezing point and raise the boiling point of the mixture. Traditionally, the combination of antifreeze and water is known as "coolant". As opposed to air-cooled vehicles which rely on fan-driven air blowing over engine components, water-cooled engines use a radiator, water pump, thermostat, heater core, hoses, and passageways within the engine.
  • Starter motors and alternators have a tough job. Starter motors are high-torque motors which must have the ability to turn over, or crank, an engine under varying weather and mechanical conditions. Without a functioning starter motor, you simply cannot start up a modern vehicle's engine.
  • If you have owned a car or truck for more than a few months, you are undoubtedly aware that your vehicle's brakes occasionally need replacing. Let's face it, we can be hard on our brakes. Highway speeds, stop-and-go traffic, and heavy cargo loads are some of the more significant factors which increase brake wear.
  • Automotive Terminology can throw you a curve ball, when you hear certain terms which might be used interchangeably, or may indicate different systems used on different cars. Take steering: perhaps your uncle said that the steering box on his truck is worn and needs replacement, then your brother said that his steering rack is leaking and needs replacement.
  • Snow, ice, freezing rain, and frigid temperatures make winter driving treacherous; nevertheless you're prepared, right? Your all-season radials have plenty of tread, the antifreeze is good to -32°F, and the ice scraper is in the car, ready to go. You even remembered to pack a blanket and cell phone charger in case you get stuck. But what about your wiper blades? If they're the same ones that baked on your windshield all summer then you could be in for problems. How do you know if your wiper blades are any good? And if they're not should you replace them with the same kind for winter driving? Read on to find out.
  • An air conditioning manifold gauge set is a must-have tool for anyone who is interested in performing some basic system work at home, such as checking pressure in a/c lines, determining if there's a leak, adding small amounts of refrigerant, or performing a complete evacuation and recharge. Compact, hand-held manifold gauge sets are used universally when servicing home air conditioning systems as well as automotive ones, and professional technicians use them same way you can in your back yard. Although shops typically have large, costly machines that do the evacuating and recharging work, similar results can be achieved with equipment that can be purchased inexpensively and stored easily.
  • Does your vehicle have a cabin air filter? You may not know the answer to this question. If you bought your vehicle new, the salesperson may have made a point of letting you know of this feature. If you’ve had your vehicle serviced at a dealership, the service writer may have suggested to you that this filter be replaced. It seems that as opposed to air, oil, and fuel filters, many car owners just don’t know if there is a cabin air filter in their car.
  • Wheel bearings are as old and important as the wheel itself thanks to their ability to allow free rotation without the damaging effects of friction and wear. In this article, we’ll define and discuss the individual components so that you are better informed when you are ready to purchase replacement wheel bearings, hubs, seals, and components. We’ll also cover the differences between “wheel bearings” or “axle bearings” mounted at the wheel itself along with “axle shaft bearings” located further inboard along axle shafts. “Bearings” are actually the small round pieces that spin within a bearing assembly. Even though bearings come in a variety of shapes, they all serve the same basic purpose.
  • If you’ve decided it’s time to replace the clutch on your manual-transmission car, you’ve reached the point where advantages (crisp, new-feeling response) have come to outweigh disadvantages (significant labor costs or time spent doing it yourself). Whether you don’t have a choice because your old clutch slips badly, or you want to take initiative and upgrade your vehicle by sharpening performance off the line, you have high expectations about the finished result once high labor costs are paid or you’ve spent a lot of time and effort doing it yourself. You’re anticipating silky release and take-in of the clutch pedal, smooth running without harshness or vibrations, crisp shifts that chirp tires on pavement, and the fact that your vehicle feels brand new again. Knowing what’s important when a clutch job is being done can get you those results and save you money, because taking shortcuts usually yields disappointment.
  • Look up "fan belt" in any modern automotive dictionary, and you'll typically find a definition that reads, "An endless belt used to transmit power from a crankshaft-driven pulley to a pulley driving the fan, alternator, or other engine accessory. It is usually V-shaped in cross section with the point of the V fitting into a groove in the pulley".
  • In this article we'll look at the differences between a "transaxle" and a "transmission". In short, a transaxle performs both the gear-changing function of a transmission and the power-splitting ability of an axle differential in one integrated unit. A transmission performs the gear-changing function only, delivering power via a single output shaft at the back of the unit. Although both perform gear shifts in the same fashion, there's often confusion about these two terms because the word "transmission" is sometimes used as a blanket description to include transaxles when it should not be.
  • An oxygen sensor (also known as an O2 sensor or Lambda sensor) is a sensor designed to generate a reading based on the content of oxygen in an automotive exhaust system. The sensor itself is made of a ceramic compound with porous-shaped electrodes coated in platinum, surrounded by a protective metal shell casing. O2 sensor casings are threaded, and the entire unit is designed to screw in until it reaches a half-in, half-out position on the exhaust pipe. Modern oxygen sensors are heated to ensure they reach operating temperature quickly.
  • Fuses are designed to stop excess current flow that can overheat circuits, damage equipment, or even cause a fire. To account for normal electrical spikes and surges, vehicle designers typically specify fuses with amp ratings of double the current flow a circuit will see under normal conditions. In automotive applications, there are push in/pull out blade fuses which resemble teeth, and there are cylindrically-shaped fuses which snap in place at both ends.
  • The question of whether to buy parts from an automotive dealer vs. ones from aftermarket manufacturers is as age-old as the automobile itself. Below, we'll take a look at things worth considering to help you make a better choice if you're facing that same question. Automobile manufacturers and dealerships always advertise the fact that their parts are "genuine" because they were made by the exact same production facility that made the parts installed on the assembly line.
  • By definition, an automotive battery is an electrochemical device that stores and provides electrical energy on demand. Electrical energy is produced inside the battery by a chemical reaction occurring between two dissimilar plates immersed in an electrolyte solution. When the battery is discharging, it changes chemical energy into electrical energy and releases current. During charging, electrical energy is converted back into chemical energy and stored.
  • Fuel injectors spray fuel directly into your engine’s cylinders during the intake stroke when a piston moves down to allow air and fuel to fill the cylinder chamber. When injectors are malfunctioning, leaking, or have failed completely, they will cause rough engine performance, poor idle, reduced power and economy, and exhaust that’s rich enough in unburned fuel to damage expensive exhaust parts such as oxygen sensors and catalytic converters.
  • In this installment, we'll give you the steps for replacing the transmission fluid and fluid filter inside your vehicle's automatic transmission – saving you several hundred dollars by sparing you a visit to the shop. This maintenance procedure is a straightforward one, and it's important for the overall longevity of your transmission. The engineers that built your car tested it thoroughly, and they know more than anyone on earth does about its breaking points and how to keep mechanical components healthy, so following your vehicle manufacturer's recommended service intervals is essential. While draining a trans pan and refilling it only replaces one-half to two-thirds of your overall fluid (the rest remains inside the torque converter), don't let it diminish the importance of keeping your automatic trans fluid (ATF) fresh.
  • Regardless of whether you're shopping for a simple replacement muffler that delivers original equipment (OE) sound and performance or an upgraded muffler which provides a deeper growl with increased power through freer exhaust flow, you'll see choices between "direct fit" mufflers and "universal" mufflers. In this article, we'll help you understand the differences between these two styles so you can make a more informed purchase.
  • An intake manifold is an integrated assembly that sits atop the engine, consisting of a series of tubes which distribute fresh outside air to each and every cylinder. On V-shaped engine blocks, an intake manifold typically sits between the two cylinder banks while inline engines may feature a manifold to the side of the cylinder head. Intake manifolds serve as a mounting point for carburetors, throttle body assemblies, fuel injectors, thermostats, and more depending on vehicle manufacturer engineering preferences. Intake manifolds may also serve to route coolant through dedicated channels in order to remove heat from the engine. Because of their location and functionality, intake manifold assemblies are under constant stress from engine vacuum pressure as well as direct heat from coolant, cylinder combustion gasses, and the cylinder heads to which they are mounted.
  • This article will guide you through a generic tune up on most any car or light duty gasoline-powered vehicle built within the last 20 years or so. We will presume that you are tuning up your engine because it has reached the mileage or time point to do so, and that you are NOT performing a tune up to cure an engine performance defect. We make this distinction because not all running/performance issues will be solved via a simple tune up.
  • Since the dawn of the automobile, spark plugs have been an integral part of gasoline engines because they conduct the electrical energy from a vehicle’s ignition system needed to finalize the combustion process. After the gas/air mixture has been fully compressed inside the cylinder head, spark plugs serve a miniature bolt of lightning to create an explosion which pushes a piston downward.
  • Does your ride have timing gears, a timing belt, or a timing chain? Is one better than the other? And perhaps most importantly, do I need to be concerned about the recommendation to replace the timing belt at a certain mileage interval? Welcome to our discussion of "engine timing".
  • In this article, we’ll introduce you to the specific tools designed to be used when replacing brake components and servicing your brake system. Having the right tools BEFORE you start working on your vehicle makes these types of jobs quick, easy, and doable for the home mechanic. It also prevents having to put things back together before the job is finished because a tool needs to be purchased. Owning the right tools and doing the job yourself will save you hundreds of dollars by sparing you a visit to the repair shop – and much more over the course of a lifetime of brake work.
  • Everyone knows that your vehicle's engine needs its oil and filter changed at regular intervals. Most folks also know that there are other items which need regular servicing and replacement, such as the air and fuel filters. But what about the cooling system? The fact is, a modern vehicle's cooling system does such a great job at preventing an engine from overheating that we all but ignore it. The reality is, all vehicle manufacturers have a recommended interval when the coolant should be replaced.
  • Internal combustion engines are extremely complex and feature a wide array of components that rotate, move up and down, pump, seal, or remain stationary. When repairing or rebuilding your engine, you will come across many different terms when referencing repair manuals and ordering parts. We know it can be confusing, especially when the repair is complex. Even if you are paying a professional to do the work, it’s good to be conversant with the topic. In order to help you understand the terminology of engine components, we’ve created the following glossary, listed in alphabetical order.
Related Suzuki Esteem Pages
Suzuki Esteem Models
  • Esteem GL Parts
  • Esteem GLX Parts
  • Esteem GLX Plus Parts