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Performance parts are meant to add horsepower and push your vehicle to its maximum capability. From air intakes and suspension systems to racing seats and performance chips – we have it all and much more to make functional or aesthetic improvement to your Maybach. Some performance parts, like turbochargers, oil coolers, dual exhausts (if not factory-installed), will add functionality which simply didn't exist previously. Other performance upgrades focus largely on aesthetic considerations, so it's up to you to decide what's best for your Maybach.

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Guides & Articles

  • Aftermarket air intake systems have become one of the most popular engine modifications available for late model cars and trucks. An easy question to ask is why are these so popular? After all, didn't engineers who work for your vehicle manufacturer spend years developing the best engine components available? Since power and fuel economy are major selling points these days, it's hard to imagine car companies not doing everything they can to maximize horsepower, miles per gallon, or both.
  • There are many types of aftermarket air intake systems that range from simple and inexpensive to elaborate. In the scope of this article, we'll examine the different types of air intakes, what they do, and look at a few specific product examples of each. But in short, performance air intake setups increase airflow into your engine - boosting combustion and creating more horsepower and torque that you can actually feel. Their relatively low cost and easy installation (bolt-on in most cases) keeps them in popular demand by car enthusiasts that own everything from 1.5-liter turbo motors to big block V8 engines.
  • Disc brakes have been the most common setup on modern vehicles for decades, with just about 100% of today's vehicles using them in the front, and many cars and trucks also equipping the rear with disc brakes. The brake pads are the wear items which will need attention sooner or later; there will be wide variations in brake pad life depending on the vehicle, driver, driving style, etc., but rough estimates are that front pads will need attention every 15,000-30,000 miles, with rear disc pads lasting 50,000-100,000 miles.
  • The brake pads which were installed on your car or truck when it was new are "fine" - fine for the average Joe who is driving an unmodified vehicle. But YOU, the auto enthusiast, you know better. You have made various drivetrain mods, or have converted your truck into a towing rig. You've added bigger wheels and tires and now want brakes which won't leave such a mess on the shiny rims. You recognize that you need to improve the "stop" to accompany the "go". The first, and easiest, item to move up to is a set of performance brake pads.
  • Twenty years after the first Jeep Wrangler model debuted in 1987, third-generation Wranglers were introduced for the 2007 model year. Unlike any previous Wranglers or CJs, a 4-door Unlimited model (known internally as the "JKU" body) was offered alongside the standard 2-door ("JK" body). Because it took the off-road capability Wranglers are known for and broadened it with the practicality of 4 doors for those needing a family vehicle, third-generation Wranglers have proven very successful in the marketplace. Maintaining Jeep tradition, this Wrangler appeals by offering a higher-than-average number of advantages for the 4x4 enthusiast, whether it's used for rock crawling or as an everyday driver.
  • Whether you're looking to replace worn brake pads and rotors or delving into more detailed brake repairs or upgrades that involve new calipers, proportioning valves, master cylinders, vacuum boosters, and more, you will come across a lot of different terminology when it comes to brake components. Depending on your knowledge and experience, a lot of these terms may be elementary. However, because many of them use similar words but represent completely different things, we've created this glossary to help you understand exactly what you need, and what you don't.
  • When first glancing through the Performance Coilover Kits section of our website, you may be put off by some of the prices you see. After all, what are you buying other than a combo set of springs and shocks under some fancy name? Certainly, you ask yourself, can't you purchase springs and shocks separately and monetarily come out ahead?
  • Has this happened to you? You catch a glimpse of a truck like yours in a parking lot or around town that, for some reason, you like better than your own. It seems to have a stance that's more rugged-looking and more suited to a 4x4 than yours does. Maybe you get a chance to stop and take a closer look immediately, or maybe it's days or weeks before you see the other truck again.
  • Seasoned professional automotive technicians often say if you're using too much physical effort during a repair, you're simply not using the right tool. This is true, and a perfect example is repairing and replacing suspension components. If you've ever done this type of work or attempted to do it, you know it can be trickier than merely loosening and tightening bolts.
  • The springs in your vehicle probably aren't something you think about until there's a problem or you've decided to upgrade suspension parts in the interest of sportier handling. But what specifically do springs do? In short, they play a major role in the safe handling and ride comfort of your vehicle. Not only do they keep a vehicle at a designated standing height, they provide recoil necessary to bounce back after suspension components move up and down over uneven road surfaces. By themselves, springs will continue to bounce up and down for a long time unless a motion damper such as a shock absorber is present to keep things stable. Springs can be soft and extremely bouncy, or they can be stiffer and less bounce-prone.
  • Shock absorbers (also known as "shocks") are the suspension components which slow, then stop, the up-and-down bouncing movement of your vehicle's springs through a process known as dampening. Without shocks to calm things down, springs will continue to extend and release energy they absorb from bumps in the road at an uncontrolled rate - bouncing for a long time until their kinetic energy finally dissipates. Needless to say, this would produce an extremely bouncy ride that would be hard to control over uneven road surfaces.
  • Engines have often been compared to air pumps, because the engine that’s most efficient in terms of economy and power is the one that can get air in and out of its cylinders the easiest. That’s why most performance modifications like conical air filters, cold air intake systems, headers, and cat-back exhaust systems are aimed at making the intake and exhaust systems less restrictive. These parts increase the flow of air into the engine and ease the flow of exhaust gas out of the engine. Among these components, headers may be the most difficult to install. In this article, we’ll discuss what headers do, their different types, and how much performance they can add to your car.
  • You may be wondering why so many aftermarket performance exhaust system manufacturers are offering dual exhaust systems connected by "H-pipe" or "X-pipe" sections. After all, aren't two separate pipes, or so-called "true duals", the best for performance? The answer is no, but to understand why we have to examine how a typical internal combustion engine works.
  • It's an age-old question that many have asked. Will an aftermarket exhaust be worth the expense? While they definitely can be, an important question to ask yourself is do you care more about the deeper sound they’re designed to produce, or the added performance gained from being less restrictive? As car enthusiasts, we’ve become accustomed to associating the sound of a car with its exhaust. After all, doesn’t everyone have a childhood memory or two of a car and the particular sound it made?
  • If you are using your "daily driver" car or truck for occasional towing duty, you are looking for that ideal sweet spot where the weekday commute is comfortable and quiet, and the weekend trailering feels solid and secure. In other words, you don't want to vehicle to feel too "stiff" during the week, nor do you want it to ride "soft" when pulling a trailer.
  • Recent data from USA Today states that only 6.5% of new vehicles sold in the U.S. are equipped with manual transmissions. The reverse of that means 93.5% of all new cars and light trucks are sold with automatic transmissions. Therefore, the odds are that your ride has an automatic. A less-known fact about those transmissions is that they all have built-in oil coolers, and the vehicle's radiator does double duty, shedding heat from both the engine coolant and the transmission fluid (ATF, or "automatic transmission fluid").
  • "Antifreeze" is a chemical, primarily consisting of ethylene glycol, which when mixed with water serves to lower the freezing point and raise the boiling point of the mixture. Traditionally, the combination of antifreeze and water is known as "coolant". As opposed to air-cooled vehicles which rely on fan-driven air blowing over engine components, water-cooled engines use a radiator, water pump, thermostat, heater core, hoses, and passageways within the engine.
  • In this article we'll look at the differences between a "transaxle" and a "transmission". In short, a transaxle performs both the gear-changing function of a transmission and the power-splitting ability of an axle differential in one integrated unit. A transmission performs the gear-changing function only, delivering power via a single output shaft at the back of the unit. Although both perform gear shifts in the same fashion, there's often confusion about these two terms because the word "transmission" is sometimes used as a blanket description to include transaxles when it should not be.
  • Fuel injectors spray fuel directly into your engine’s cylinders during the intake stroke when a piston moves down to allow air and fuel to fill the cylinder chamber. When injectors are malfunctioning, leaking, or have failed completely, they will cause rough engine performance, poor idle, reduced power and economy, and exhaust that’s rich enough in unburned fuel to damage expensive exhaust parts such as oxygen sensors and catalytic converters.
  • In this installment, we'll give you the steps for replacing the transmission fluid and fluid filter inside your vehicle's automatic transmission – saving you several hundred dollars by sparing you a visit to the shop. This maintenance procedure is a straightforward one, and it's important for the overall longevity of your transmission. The engineers that built your car tested it thoroughly, and they know more than anyone on earth does about its breaking points and how to keep mechanical components healthy, so following your vehicle manufacturer's recommended service intervals is essential. While draining a trans pan and refilling it only replaces one-half to two-thirds of your overall fluid (the rest remains inside the torque converter), don't let it diminish the importance of keeping your automatic trans fluid (ATF) fresh.
  • Regardless of whether you're shopping for a simple replacement muffler that delivers original equipment (OE) sound and performance or an upgraded muffler which provides a deeper growl with increased power through freer exhaust flow, you'll see choices between "direct fit" mufflers and "universal" mufflers. In this article, we'll help you understand the differences between these two styles so you can make a more informed purchase.
  • An intake manifold is an integrated assembly that sits atop the engine, consisting of a series of tubes which distribute fresh outside air to each and every cylinder. On V-shaped engine blocks, an intake manifold typically sits between the two cylinder banks while inline engines may feature a manifold to the side of the cylinder head. Intake manifolds serve as a mounting point for carburetors, throttle body assemblies, fuel injectors, thermostats, and more depending on vehicle manufacturer engineering preferences. Intake manifolds may also serve to route coolant through dedicated channels in order to remove heat from the engine. Because of their location and functionality, intake manifold assemblies are under constant stress from engine vacuum pressure as well as direct heat from coolant, cylinder combustion gasses, and the cylinder heads to which they are mounted.
  • Since the dawn of the automobile, spark plugs have been an integral part of gasoline engines because they conduct the electrical energy from a vehicle’s ignition system needed to finalize the combustion process. After the gas/air mixture has been fully compressed inside the cylinder head, spark plugs serve a miniature bolt of lightning to create an explosion which pushes a piston downward.
  • Does your ride have timing gears, a timing belt, or a timing chain? Is one better than the other? And perhaps most importantly, do I need to be concerned about the recommendation to replace the timing belt at a certain mileage interval? Welcome to our discussion of "engine timing".
  • Everyone knows that your vehicle's engine needs its oil and filter changed at regular intervals. Most folks also know that there are other items which need regular servicing and replacement, such as the air and fuel filters. But what about the cooling system? The fact is, a modern vehicle's cooling system does such a great job at preventing an engine from overheating that we all but ignore it. The reality is, all vehicle manufacturers have a recommended interval when the coolant should be replaced.
  • Disc brake rotors (aka 'rotors') are the actual discs that brake pads clamp onto, creating friction that slows a vehicle. Disc brake rotors bolt on over the axle hub and contain holes that allow wheel mounting bolts to pass through and rotate with the wheels. Since there are many rotor styles and designs specially created for every budget and need, we’ve listed the advantages of each disc brake rotor so that you can make the right choice and get the best for your vehicle. All rotors, except ceramic brake rotors and two-piece rotors with aluminum centers, are typically one piece and crafted from iron for maximum heat absorption.
  • Very often we don't even realize what a crucial role a car's suspension plays in providing a safe and comfortable ride. The system maximizes the friction between the road surface and your vehicle's tires, ensuring steering stability along with responsive handling.
  • Squealing noise upon brake application is actually caused by a high-frequency vibration of metal rotors, drums, or brake pad backing plates. Excess corrosion that forms over time on non-contact, outer perimeter areas of rotors and drums is a prime cause because rust is looser and less dense in nature – therefore, more likely to create resonation.
  • If you've had to replace brake pads or rotors on modern vehicles, you know how expensive the parts and labor can be. Because extending your brake pad life puts real money back into your pocket, we offer some tips for those who are interested in doing just that. While it's a general rule that brake pads designed with aggressive grip levels and performance driving will result in faster wear, the following suggestions will help you extend your brake life significantly no matter what type of brakes you have on your vehicle.
  • The very first thing to know about timely suspension system diagnosis is that the stability and steering control of your vehicle and, what is more important, your safety on the road depends on how often you make it. Automotive suspension belongs to one of those car systems that are constantly exposed to high loads and thus are prone to wear and tear. Most specialists recommend inspecting suspension system after every 6,500-7,500 miles or when there are any signs of its breakage.