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COMPARISON

Standard image 1
50
5500
9*5050 SMD
T10 Wedge Bulbs 194 / 168 / 921
White bulb luminocity comparison
white Color Temperature
LED type
Plazma image 1
400
6500-7500
1*Cree, 4*Epistar
Standard image 2
60/150
5500
27*5050 SMD
Exterior Bulbs 1156 / 1157 / 7507 / 3156 / 3157 / 7440 / 7443 / 9005 / 9006 / 9007 H4 / H7 / H8 / H10 / H11 / H16
White bulb luminocity comparison
white Color Temperature
LED type
Plazma image 2
420
6500-7500
1*Cree, 4*Epistar
Standard image 3
60/150
5500
27*5050 SMD
Interior Bulbs 1.25" / 1.50" / 1.75"
White bulb luminocity comparison
white Color Temperature
LED type
Plazma image 3
420
6500-7500
1*Cree, 4*Epistar

How do plasma LEDs work compared to standard LED bulbs? Standard LED bulbs emit their light directly from semiconductor chips when current is applied, instead of emitting light from a vacuum the way incandescent bulbs do. In plasma bulbs, a radio frequency signal is generated by a solid-state power amplifier and directed into an electric field created inside the bulb. Once electrical current is applied, gas and metal halide materials inside the bulb vaporize into a plasma state to create light output that is as twice as dazzling as standard LED bulbs.

The controlled plasma within a plasma LED bulb typically generates 150 lumens per watt on average - an intense source of light compared to the typical 70 for standard LEDs and 15 for incandescent bulbs. For comparison, Xenon bulbs work far less efficiently generating 20-24 lumens per watt at far greater temperatures Fahrenheit. CFL light bulbs found in home lighting applications generate only 70 lumens per watt. Both LEDs designed for external lighting applications where illumination needs to be projected further typically have a lens on the front of the bulb in order focus and aim the light into a more focused beam.